Is this possible Bob Dylan connection taking us to Warp Speed?

In the early years when I had moved to Minnesota from Boston — via San Francisco and New York City — I had never heard of Gustav Mahler. His music had been the rave of New York for some time — Leonard Bernstein being one of Mahler’s greatest champions. But I attended a luncheon concert of the Minnesota Orchestra quite by chance, and my life changed forever…

This was back in the days when the Minnesota Orchestra was not great. The players were bored. They were more interested in their poker games in the downstairs lounge at Orchestra Hall than they were in the music they were performing. They knew all the old war horses by heart. They did not even need a conductor. Even worse, the one they had most of the time was reportedly becoming senile. He had had to stop mid-stream in a performance of the Stravinsky Sacre du Printemps because he had become hopelessly confused.

–I should say that I was studying flute with Sid Zeitlin, the Principal Flute, at that time, sometimes at Orchestra Hall, so my recollections are either from things I saw first-hand or heard via him–

So there I was, sitting calmly in my seat on the isle, mid-section of the main floor, that morning, expecting to fall asleep as during a bad sermon, but still mildly hopeful of hearing something truly musical. I don’t recall the rest of the program. Whatever it was had completely lulled me into complacency.

The guest conductor that day was Klaus Tennstedt. I had not heard of him either, and was not terribly impressed with his first half of the concert. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus_Tennstedt

I was prepared to accept yet another grim reminder of how not to perform orchestral music.

But then, the Mahler First Symphony began.

The ‘Titan’, it was called.

My ears perked up. Before long I was listening with my entire being. His world came alive to me. I was no longer just sitting in a cushioned seat — I was transported to another time and place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No.1(Mahler)#Second_movement

The Third Movement, with its mocking motif of “Frere Jacques” caused me to sit up in shock. It was as though Mahler was describing the fallen angel in the Mozart vortex who attacks my family and me. Who had caused my Father to nearly succeed in ending his own life. How could he possibly know this? I wondered. Nobody else had ever done this.

The opening passage of the last movement shrieked inside my head. Mahler was speaking to me from the vortex. I shook my head in disbelief. I thought I was going to faint.

How did Mahler get inside my head? I asked myself…

And so he had…

And my quest began in earnest…

I became a frantic and fanatic Mahlerian. I have been so ever since.

And, according to his wife, Alma, Mahler’s final words were “Mozart! Mozart! Mozart!’

Mahler was the first inter-continental conductor, transiting by ship from Europe to New York. He was one of the first conductors of the orchestra that became the New York Phil. Carnegie Hall was his venue.

I realized that it was Mahler who had brought the Mozart vortex from Vienna to New York.

At a great price — he died at an early date and in a tragic way…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Mahler

His widow, Alma, remarried and lived a long life. She maintained a home in NYC until her death in 1964.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alma_Mahler

But what happened after that? The fallen angel kept trying to attack and entrap my children and me in Minnesota. We seemed to be free-falling into the vortex ourselves, with no direction known.

That is, until this unique and completely unexpected possible connection to Minnesota-born Bob Dylan surfaced.

And now, it just may be that this is what is catapulting us into our destiny after all…

Minnegeddon?

July 15, 2020

When I saw this photo of the pope looking at an empty St. Peter’s Square at Easter, my first thought, of course, was to wonder how he felt.  My second thought, however, was about Wolfgang Mozart.

Young Mozart, with a number of stellar achievements already behind him, had an audience with Pope Clement XV on April 11, 1770.

https://aleteia.org/2019/09/17/the-choral-piece-that-earned-mozart-a-papal-honor/

One might think that the pope, of all people, would not have stopped with conferring just a worldly honor on Mozart, but would have gone on to acknowledge that there was yet another gift that deserved to be validated, even though it was ephemeral.  It is the gift of perfection that is an integral part of everything that Mozart wrote.  It is a gift of shalom granted to no other musician before him.  Everyone sensed it.  It had already created tumult even in the Italian musical community, where Mozart was accused of allowing his father to write an opera for him.

But the pope said nothing about this divine distinction.  As a result, I believe, Mozart did not fully understand how different he was until much later in his life, when he realized that he was surrounded by a vortex of evil — those close to him who had agreed upon his death.

And it was because of this gift that Mozart was killed.  And this assassination — this Murder Most Foul — has remained a closely-guarded secret through the years.  Until now.

Ironically, with the onset of this terrible pandemic, and the physical distancing that everyone is keeping, we may all have a much better idea about what Mozart’s life was really like.

And, at last, the truth about what really happened to Mozart is becoming evident to everyone.

I call this Minnegeddon…

Update, February 22, 2021

We are coming through a year of pandemic. Ironically, it is called “Corona”. I say ‘ironically’ because when I was growing up with my birth family who were, to say the least, treating the Zauberflote with a lack of respect, my father insisted that I take a high school typing class twice, because I only scored 95 words per minute the first time.  That was on a Corona typewriter.

Orchestra Hall is still dark. In fact, concert venues in most places are as well.  Is the truth about what really happened to Wolfgang Mozart coming to light — in spite if the deadly attempts of the ‘insiders’ who are trying to keep it secret? Will the Zauberflote be heard once more on the stage at Orchestra Hall — but this time, in the light? Will those who have been attempting to silence it be unmasked?

Time will tell…

Would you care?

Would it matter if you were to learn that most of what you are being told about the death of Wolfgang Mozart is false? Would it matter if you knew that there were some who passed the truth down in a secret and occult manner? And that this was being deliberately withheld from the general public? Would it matter if the movie “Amadeus” was intended to put up a smokescreen to make sure the truth never came to light?

Suppose you have been deliberately kept in the dark so that you can be more easily controlled by people who may have a hidden agenda?  What if you are not being told so that you do not have the full blessings of prosperity that could be available to you? What if there are those deliberately perpetrating a hoax at your expense?

Would you care?

If so, I may be able to help…

So you think you’d make a good Wolfgang Mozart? (You might want to think again)…

Most everyone who knew Wolf during his lifetime, as well as many people since his untimely death, have at one point or another compared themselves to Wolfgang Mozart, and may have even decided they would do a better job with his gifts than he did. Or have less turmoil in their life than Wolf did. Or are just plain more deserving than Wolf was.

Well, you just might want to find out what his life was really like. No, most of the biographies that you read about him are intentionally misleading. They leave a lot out — and for good reason. For one, they are attempting to cover up the fact that he was not as bad a human being as he tends to be portrayed. (Nore was he a nice guy. Just not as bad as they say.) For another, they are attempting to keep control of a number of secrets about him — things the insiders don’t want the general public to know.

Why? Because some of our most revered musical establishments juar might end up going dark for good. Oh, and a monarchy or two might be turned upside-down. Little things such as that.

So what was a day in the life of Wolf really like? Well, musically-speaking we have a pretty good idea, from his letters and scores, and from the excellent documentation that accompanies them. But I think the quality of his personal life was another matter altogether.

For one, he was never able to just be a child. He didn’t grow up gradually as most people do. He was thrust into the limelight at a very early age. All of his relationships were based on his phenomenal gifts. He was not protected. He was exploited. He did not know whom to trust. In fact, there was no-one he could trust. Even his family members had agreed not to tell him about the fact that there was something truly unusual about his gift — something beyond their comprehension. Instead, they tried to pretend that he was just like them.

Somehow, I think they developed a way to maintain that illusion — and that was to systematically poison him from a fairly young age. I don’t know just how it started, but I do know his sister Nannerl became increasingly jealous of him as his fame climbed and hers diminished. I don’t know how far his Father Leopold was willing to go to keep Wolf under control. But I do think that his Mother, ignorant as she probably was of these terrible shenanigans, failed to protect him.

I also think that when he married Constanze she continued to do this, also in order to control him and make him vulnerable. Wolf said himself at one point that he felt as though he was being poisoned — I just don’t think he understood the subtlety with which it may have been done. When he died, there was no autopsy and no burial. This might explain why.

So, following my hypothesis, at every turn Wolf was accompanied by a controller, so to speak. An assassin, a Judas, pretending to be his friend. I don’t think he put things together until late in his life. Everything he wrote, everything he performed or conducted I think he did under a threat of imminent death.

Wolf did his best. Always. And he never complained.

Now, if I am correct, would you even want to spend one hour in his shoes?

Why not Mahler, Norman? (part one)

A while back music critic and arts lover Norman Lebrecht wrote a somewhat impudent and controversial book about Gustav Mahler, called ‘Why Mahler?’ Even though Mahler’s music was at last standard fare with most symphonies, his stated intent was to bring additional attention to the symphonies and lieder of Mahler. The central focus of the book was apparently to ask and answer the question of what value Maher and his music have for us today.

As curious as this book is, there may be wider and even more significant implications to Mahler and his life than anything Mr. Lebrecht has posited. In fact, Mr. Lebrecht might have deliberately slanted or eliminated significant facets of Mahler’s life, possibly even for some mysterious agenda of his own. Some of these significant issues may, in fact, have something to do with me and the Zauberflote.  And Mozart. And New York City.

Let me explain…

If I am correct, when Wolfgang Mozart died some sort of vortex of energy was created.  It was centered at the house where he died, on Rauhensteingasse, in Vienna.  It may have been created from the energy of the unusual and additional gift in Mozart’s music — something I call a ‘gift of shalom’. It is also the ‘Zauber’ in the Zauberflote. Something unique. Something overwhelmingly controversial. Something sublime. It has also been labeled “The Mozart Effect.” Exactly what happened to Wolf is another story, and one that I won’t go into now, but let me just say that it seems to me there is still a great mystery around Wolf and his death, and the existence of such a vortex just might be part of the explanation.

Mahler found his passion for composing in Vienna and spent much of his life there.  Did he sense the vortex connected to Mozart and his music?  Did he step into the mystery of what happened to Mozart and why, as, for example, I think Beethoven did? Or could he have been unsuspectedly pulled into this vortex of powerful energy?  I ask this question because of what he decided to do at a critical point in his life.

When working with the Vienna Opera became unbearably painful, Gustav Mahler set his sights on America.  New York City, to be specific.  He became the first globe-trotting conductor of great stature.  In fact, for the last five years of his life he traveled back and forth between Europe and America, conducting with the newly-funded New York Philharmonic.

All right, you might say.  A couple of interesting coincidences…

But there is more.  Mr. Lebrecht fails to include any mention of what Gustav’s wife, Alma, said about her husband’s last words.  What were they?

“Mozart!  Mozart!  Mozart!”

I boldly proclaim that this exhortation puts dear Mahler in the center of the Mozart vortex.  Not only that, but Alma actually moved to New York City after his death, living at 120 E. 72nd street.  She died there in 1964.  So was she aware of his possible connection to the vortex?

Mr. Lebrecht knows of me from my posting on his popular Slipped Disc blog during the lockout of the Minnesota Orchestra players.  I hoped, as a fellow Mahlerian (for I am indeed also obsessed with Mahler and his music) that he might listen to what I had to say.  I explained that I felt I  had an unusual and tangential connection to the lockout, in that previously some of the players, whom I have no choice but to call “Monostatos” used the stage at Orchestra Hall as a device to threaten and discourage me and, in effect, lock me out.  I had hoped for at least a sympathetic ear.  But, instead, Mr. Lebrecht allowed a music critic from Chicago (where I was born, incidentally) to attempt to slander me on that blog. That attempt was not successful and, ironically, Andrew Patner collapsed and died unexpectedly a few months later.  So it was at this point I accepted that I had not won over Mr. Lebrecht, who boasts of 1 million viewers a month on his blog.

Let me finish by stating that because of my Father’s job as a metallurgical engineer, our family moved from Chicago to the New York City metro area when I was three and I grew up in a nearby town in Connecticut.  Later I moved to New York City, living not far from where Alma had lived.  My dear husband Donner, who passed away tragically and unexpectedly this spring, grew up in the same neighborhood.

And so I ask you, and Mr. Lebrecht, to consider the possibility that the importance of Gustav Mahler has yet another dimension, one certainly mysterious but perhaps even more profound than of those we already know.

Did Mahler bring the Mozart vortex from Vienna to New York City? And, if so, what are the implications?

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