What do I mean by my being ‘locked out’ by the Minnesota Orchestra…

For the first time in almost 200 years the sound of new Mozart was heard on the stage at Orchestra Hall. But it was not heard during a concert, nor was it given a proper introduction. Instead, the man I call “Monostatos” enticed me and die zauberflote to ‘practice’ on the darkened stage. The sound was heard throughout the building because the sound system was connected to the stage. Week after week, during our captivity at the hands of Monostatos, I played pieces from the flute and violin repertoire. To what end? Colleagues of Monostatos, in effect, crawled out of the woodwork, behaving very strangely. Everyone knew what was happening. But have you heard the slightest bit of excitement about these extraordinary circumstances? No. Instead, Monostatos and his buddies have done everything in their power to slander my credibility as a musican and, yes, even cause me bodily harm.

During the recent lockout of the players, I began to wonder if their being locked out had any connection to their earlier ‘lockout’ of me and die zauberflote. So I wrote to Mr. Vanska and explained my situation. I asked for die zauberflote to be heard again on that same stage. I did everything I could think of to bring die zauberflote to the attention of the Board as well. I felt that this could be an opportunity to resolve both their issues and mine.

But, unfortunately, that did not happen. To this day, that letter has, in fact, gone unanswered…

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An as-yet undefined subplot in the opera Die Zauberflote as prophecy…

There are some straightforward characters in Mozart’s last major opera, The Magic Flute, that correspond to those in real life — my Mother,for example — the real-life Queen of the Night who managed to bewitch just about everyone (but me); my Father, who gave me my first flute; Monostatos, who is a player with the Minnesota Orchestra, and of course, my three children, who are represented as such. The reality, however, may be even more profound than the opera (granted, Wolf didn’t have all the time in the world either) in that the children who save Pamina from despair when Tamino is silent are actually her own children. Filled with fury, the Queen of the Night comes after the children and tries to use them in her machinations, attempting to leave Pamina bereft, and thereby contributing greatly to Pamina’s despair. Monostatos also goes after the children and attempts to enlist them to the Queen’s agenda…

…and so, all that is left for Pamina is the wondrous sound and assurance of die zauberflote…

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Minnegeddon?

 

When I saw this photo of the pope looking at an empty St. Peter’s Square at Easter, my first thought, of course, was to wonder how he felt.  My second thought, however, was about Wolfgang Mozart.

Young Mozart, with a number of stellar achievements already behind him, had an audience with Pope Clement XV on April 11, 1770.

The choral piece that earned Mozart a papal honor

One might think that the pope, of all people, would not have stopped with conferring just a worldly honor on Mozart, but would have gone on to acknowledge that there was yet another gift that deserved to be validated, even though it was ephemeral.  It is the gift of perfection that is an integral part of everything that Mozart wrote.  It is a gift of shalom granted to no other musician before him.  Everyone sensed it.  It had already created tumult even in the Italian musical community, where Mozart was accused of allowing his father to write an opera for him.

But the pope said nothing about this divine distinction.  As a result, I believe, Mozart did not fully understand how different he was until much later in his life, when he realized that he was surrounded by a vortex of evil — those close to him who had agreed upon his death.

And it was because of this gift that Mozart was killed.  And this assassination — this Murder Most Foul — has remained a closely-guarded secret through the years.  Until now.

Ironically, with the onset of this terrible pandemic, and the physical distancing that everyone is keeping, we may all have a much better idea about what Mozart’s life was really like.

And, at last, the truth about what really happened to Mozart is becoming evident to everyone.

I call this Minnegeddon…

 

 

 

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